LANGURS, LEAF MONKEYS, LUTUNGS, AND SURILIS

The langur group, of the subfamily Colobinae,
includes 5 genera and at least 46 species and 41 subspecies

DOUC LANGURS

Genus: Pygathrix

Photo credit: ©Hoang Minh Duc, PhD. Used with permission.

Pygathrix nigripes

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The black-shanked douc langur is one of three species of douc langurs (the red-shanked and the gray-shanked are the other two) and is found only in eastern Cambodia and southwestern Vietnam, residing in primary and secondary monsoon forests and rainforests, from medium to high altitudes. Cambodia’s Mondulkiri province is…

LEARN MORE ABOUT BLACK-SHANKED DOUC LANGURS

Photo credit: Art G/Creative Commons

Pygathrix cinerea

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The gray-shanked douc langur is one of three species of douc langurs (the red-shanked and black-shanked are the other two) and is found only in fragmented populations of Vietnam’s central highlands, high in the forest canopy. Home range for this extremely rare monkey includes the provinces of Quang Nam, Quang Ngai, Binh…

LEARN MORE ABOUT GRAY-SHANKED DOUC LANGURS

Pygathrix nemaeus

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The red-shanked douc langur is one of three species of douc langurs (the gray-shanked and black-shanked are the other two) and is native to Indochina, inhabiting the undisturbed evergreen, semi-evergreen, and limestone forests of east-central Laos and northern and central Vietnam. These Endangered primates make their home in…

LEARN MORE ABOUT RED-SHANKED DOUC LANGURS

GRAY LANGURS

Genus: Semnopithecus

Photo credit: Danilel Colombo/Flickr/Creative Commons

Semnopithecus hypoleucos

CONSERVATION STATUS: LEAST CONCERN

Black-footed gray langurs, also called dark-legged Malabar langurs and Malabar sacred langurs, are endemic to the Western Ghats, a mountain range on the southwestern coast of the Indian peninsula. They are found at altitudes ranging between 300 and 3,900 feet (100–1,200 m) in the patchy rainforests and deciduous or scrub…

LEARN MORE ABOUT BLACK-FOOTED GRAY LANGURS

Photo credit: Francesco Veronesi/Flickr/Creative Commons

Semnopithecus ajax

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

The Chamba Valley of Himachal Pradesh, a mountainous state of northwestern India situated in the Western Himalayas, is home to the Kashmir gray langur. Whether or not this leaf-eating monkey inhabits the region of Kashmir (one of the species’s namesakes) is uncertain. However, some wildlife biologists assert that Kashmir…

LEARN MORE ABOUT KASHMIR GRAY LANGURS

Semnopithecus schistaceus

CONSERVATION STATUS: LEAST CONCERN

The Nepal gray langur, also called the central Himalayan langur, lives (as the name implies) in the Himalayan region, from central Nepal to Tibet, into areas of Bhutan, India, and Pakistan. They are the northernmost population of gray langurs, and they are one of only a few colobine species to live in temperate regions as…

LEARN MORE ABOUT NEPAL GRAY LANGURS

Semnopithecus johnii

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The Nilgiri langur, also known as the black leaf monkey, hooded leaf monkey, Indian hooded leaf monkey, John’s langur, Nilgiri black langur, or Nilgiri leaf monkey, is endemic to India. Specifically, Nilgiri langurs occur in a patchy distribution across the Western Ghats mountains in southwestern India. They live at elevations between…

LEARN MORE ABOUT NILGIRI LANGURS

Semnopithecus entellus

CONSERVATION STATUS: LEAST CONCERN

The northern plains gray langur is one of eight species of gray langur and is also known as the Hanuman langur, Bengal langur, or sacred langur. They are found across a wide area of India, south of the Himalayas. Northern plains gray langurs are also found in Western Bangladesh, although this population is believed to have been…

LEARN MORE ABOUT NORTHERN PLAINS GRAY LANGURS

Semnopithecus vetulus

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

Purple-faced langurs, also known as purple-faced leaf monkeys, are endemic to Sri Lanka. In Sinhala, one of the official languages of Sri Lanka, they are known as “the black monkey of Sri Lanka.” Located near the southern tip of India, the tropical island of Sri Lanka is teeming in biodiversity. This is thanks in part to its varying land…

LEARN MORE ABOUT PURPLE-FACED LANGURS

Semnopithecus hector

CONSERVATION STATUS: NEAR THREATENED

Tarai gray langurs occur in southwestern Bhutan (in Pankhabari), northern India (in Uttaranchal, Uttar Pradesh, and West Bengal), and southwestern Nepal (in Rajaji National Park) at elevations of 490–5,250 ft (150–1,600 m). They are very flexible in their habitat choices and can be found in a variety of habitats, from the moist…

LEARN MORE ABOUT TARAI GRAY LANGURS

Semnopithecus priam

CONSERVATION STATUS: NEAR THREATENED

The tufted gray langur, also known as the Madras gray langur and the Coromandel sacred langur, is an Old World monkey found in east Asia on the mainland of southeastern India and the island of Sri Lanka. They are widely distributed throughout tropical dry and coastal forests. Their ability to adapt to human settlements allows them…

LEARN MORE ABOUT TUFTED GRAY LANGURS

Semnopithecus vetulus nestor

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The western purple-faced langur is endemic to the tropical rainforests in southwest Sri Lanka around Colombo, the country’s largest city. This region of Sri Lanka is called the wet zone because it receives up to twice as much annual rainfall as the rest of the island (98 in or 250 cm). This gives the langur its other name, the “north…

LEARN MORE ABOUT WESTERN PURPLE-FACED LANGURS

LUTUNGS

Genus: Trachypithecus

Trachypithecus pileatus

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The capped langur is found in Bhutan, northeast India, Bangladesh, western Myanmar, and possibly China. They live in subtropical and montane forests rich in vegetation and freshwater streams. The region is characterized by steady moderate temperature and heavy rainfall during the summer months. There are four capped langur four…

LEARN MORE ABOUT CAPPED LANGURS

Photo courtesy of ©Neahga Leonard, Cat Ba Langur Conservation Project

Trachypithecus poliocephalus

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The Cat Ba langur, or golden-headed langur, is only found on Cat Ba, the largest (110 sq m / 285 sq km) of the 367 islands that comprise the Cat Ba Archipelago in the Gulf of Tonkin, northeastern Vietnam. It is the only island in the archipelago where humans live (approximately 13,000) and where tourism has developed over the years…

LEARN MORE ABOUT CAT BA LANGURS

Photo courtesy of ©Nguyen Van Truong. Used with permission

Trachypithecus delacouri

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The Delacour’s langur is endemic to a small section of northern Vietnam just south of Hanoi. Their few remaining subpopulations mostly inhabit open subtropical rainforests, spending most of their time on limestone rocks and in caves. Delacour’s langurs are noted for the distinct white patches of fur over their thighs, which is in contrast…

LEARN MORE ABOUT DELACOUR’S LANGURS

Trachypithecus obscurus

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

Dusky langurs—also known as spectacled langurs, dusky leaf monkeys, and spectacled leaf monkeys–are found primarily on Asia’s Malay Peninsula. Their range includes southern Burma (Myanmar), parts of Thailand, and the Malaysian islands of Langkawi, Penang, and Perhentian Besar. These arboreal (that is, tree-dwelling) primates…

LEARN MORE ABOUT DUSKY LANGURS

Trachypithecus francoisi

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

​Francois’s langurs, also known as the Tonkin langur and the Tonkin leaf monkey, live in the forests that grow along the steep ledges of limestone mountains, known as karst, which are a signature of the landscape of northern Vietnam and southern China. Historically, their distribution spanned across Vietnam’s northeastern…

LEARN MORE ABOUT FRANCOIS’S LANGUR

Trachypithecus geei

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

The shy and highly endangered Gee’s golden langur is found along the border between India and Bhutan, where it has learned to accommodate a range of environments and altitudes. Specifically, golden langurs inhabit a region marked by four distinct geographical points: in the north, the foothills of Bhutan; in the south, the…

LEARN MORE ABOUT GEE’S GOLDEN LANGUR

Trachypithecus hatinhensis

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

The Hatinh langur is endemic to Vietnam—a Southeast Asian country about the same size as New Mexico—and to the People’s Democratic Republic of Laos. Although Hatinh langurs are not actually gibbons, locals often refer to them as long-tailed or black gibbons. These elusive creatures inhabit the dense Annamite mountain range…

LEARN MORE ABOUT HATINH LANGURS

Trachypithecus germaini

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

Also known as Germain’s langur, the Indochinese silvered langur is found in Eastern Asia, west of the Mekong river. They are distributed across a large part of Cambodia, as well as parts of Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar. This species inhabits a range of forested habitats, including lowland, semi-evergreen and evergreen…

LEARN MORE ABOUT INDOCHINESE SILVERED LANGURS

Trachypithecus phayrei

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

Phayre’s leaf monkey, also known as Phayre’s langur, is an Old World monkey native to Southeast Asia. Its geographic distribution spans the countries of India (specifically, the northeastern states of Tripura, Mizoram, and Assam), Bangladesh, Myanmar (formerly known as Burma), China, Lao PDR (Laos), Thailand, and Vietnam…

LEARN MORE ABOUT PHAYRE’S LEAF MONKEY

Trachypithecus cristatus

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The silvery lutung, also known as the silvered leaf monkey or the silvered langur, is found in Brunei, Indonesia and Malaysia. They may occur on Batam in the Riau Archipelago as well. Silvery lutungs prefer dense forests; however, their habitat varies depending on the region they inhabit. In the Malayan Peninsula, they live in…

LEARN MORE ABOUT SILVERY LUTUNGS

Trachypithecus auratus

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

Spangled ebony langurs are Old World primates in the Colobine, or leaf-eating, family. They are endemic to isolated forest fragments of East Java, as well as the small islands of Bali, Lombok, Palau Sempu, and Nusa Barong. These volcanic islands are home to deciduous forests drenched by heavy downpours during the wet…

LEARN MORE ABOUT SPANGLED EBONY LANGURS

Trachypithecus mauritius

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The West Javan ebony langur is a species of Old World monkey native to the island of Java, west of Jakarta. They are well at home in the lush forests of the island, occupying primary and secondary dry deciduous, mangrove, beach, freshwater, swamp, and hill forests. Until recently, West Javan ebony langurs were…

LEARN MORE ABOUT WEST JAVAN EBONY LANGURS

Trachypithecus leucocephalus

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

Home to the white-headed black langur, or more simply known as the white-headed langur is the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region (GZAR) of southern China, bordering Vietnam and the Gulf of Tonkin. Demarcating the species’s narrow geographic range is the Zuojiang River in the north and northwest; the Mingjiang River in…

LEARN MORE ABOUT WHITE-HEADED BLACK LANGURS

PIG-TAILED LANGURS

Genus: Simias

Photo courtesy of ©Wendy Erb. Used with permission.

Simias concolor

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

Endemic to Indonesia, the pig-tailed snub-nosed langur (also known by its less-pejorative nickname, the simakobu monkey) is found only on the archipelago of Mentawai off the western coast of Sumatra. Interspersed through the islands of Siberut, Sipora, North Pagai, and South Pagai, and through a few offshore islets, these…

LEARN MORE ABOUT PIG-TAILED SNUB-NOSED LANGURS

SURILIS

Genus: Presbytis

Presbytis femoralis

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The banded surili, also known as the banded langur or the banded leaf monkey, and sometimes known as Raffles’ banded langur, once roamed the tropical jungles from the southern peninsulas of Myanmar and Thailand to the islands of Singapore and Sumatra. Changes in their environment caused by humans have not only…

LEARN MORE ABOUT BANDED SURILIS

Presbytis comata

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

The Javan surili, also known as the grizzled leaf monkey, Java leaf monkey, and Javan grizzled langur, is a small endangered primate endemic to the island of Java, Indonesia. It inhabits the western and central regions of the island within fragmented pockets as far east as Mt. Lawu on the border with East Java. The Javan surili’s…

LEARN MORE ABOUT JAVAN SURILIS

Presbytis rubicunda

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The maroon leaf monkey, also called maroon langurs, maroon surilis, and red leaf monkeys, is endemic to the Island of Borneo, specifically Kalimantan, Indonesia, and Sabah and Sarawak, Malaysia. Maroon leaf monkeys are widespread and found high in the trees. They live in primary and secondary lowland forests. They are also…

LEARN MORE ABOUT MAROON LEAF MONKEYS

Presbytis melalophos

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

Mitred leaf monkeys, also known as yellow-handed mitred langurs and Sumatran surilis, are langurs found on the island of Sumatra, Indonesia, and on the small island of Pulau Pini in the Batu Archipelago, just off the coast of Sumatra. They make their homes mostly in lowland rainforests nearby rivers, but occasionally reside at higher altitudes. The forest understory is their preferred habitat; however, mitred leaf monkeys sometimes inhabit the…

LEARN MORE ABOUT MITRED LEAF MONKEYS

Presbytis natunae

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The Natuna Island surili, or Natuna leaf monkey, lives on the Bunguran Island of the Natuna archipelago, some 140 miles (225 km) north of Borneo in South East Asia. The whole island is about 656 square miles (1,700 square km), which is about half the size of Rhode Island, the smallest state in the US. Limited distributions, like with the Natuna Island surili, happen when…

LEARN MORE ABOUT NATUNA ISLAND SURILIS

Presbytis thomasi

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

Indicative of one of its aliases, Northern Sumatran leaf monkeys, Thomas’s leaf monkeys inhabit the island of Sumatra in Indonesia, residing in remote Aceh Province. The species’ range extends north of the Wampu and Simpangkiri Rivers and stretches to the southern bank of the Simpangkiri River. Home range is between 30.39…

LEARN MORE ABOUT THOMAS’S LEAF MONKEYS

Photo credit: budak/Flickr/Creative Commons​

Presbytis siamensis

CONSERVATION STATUS: NEAR THREATENED

White-thighed surilis, also known as pale-thighed langurs (a species of leaf monkey), are endemic to Southeast Asia. Isolated populations reside in the countries of Indonesia on the island of Sumatra and east of Sumatra on the granite islands of the Riau Archipelago within the Strait of Malacca; in the Peninsular Malaysia (also known…

LEARN MORE ABOUT WHITE-THIGHED SURILIS