MANGABEYS

The mangabey tribe, Papionini, includes two genera, Cercocebus with seven species and two subspecies, and Lophocebus two species and five subspecies.

CRESTED MANGABEYS

Genus: Lophocebus

Lophocebus aterrimus

CONSERVATION STATUS: NEAR THREATENED

Black-crested mangabeys, also known as black mangabeys, are distributed patchily across the rainforests of Angola and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Deforestation has reduced their native forests to islets amidst large expanses of savanna and agricultural land. Within these islets, the mangabeys spend most of their time foraging in the trees between the middle and upper canopy. They prefer…

LEARN MORE ABOUT BLACK CRESTED MANGABEYS

Lophocebus albigena

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The gray-cheeked mangabey, also known as the white-cheeked mangabey, can be found in the forests of Central Africa, from Cameroon in the north to Gabon in the south. These large monkeys are almost completely arboreal and rarely come to the ground. They prefer to use the upper to middle layer of the canopy as they travel from tree to tree looking for food. Mangabeys are adapted to live in different types…

LEARN MORE ABOUT GRAY-CHEEKED MANGABEY

WHITE-EYELID MANGABEYS

Genus: Cercocebus

Photo credit: Gregoire Dubois/Flickr/Creative Commons

Cercocebus agilis

CONSERVATION STATUS: LEAST CONCERN

Agile mangabeys are Old World monkeys found north of the Congo River to Garamba and the Semliki River. They are present in Cameroon, northeast Gabon, northern Congo, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Central African Republic, and possible Equatorial Guinea. Agile mangabeys are found primarily in…

LEARN MORE ABOUT AGILE MANGABEYS

Cercocebus chrysogaster

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

Golden-bellied mangabeys are Old World monkeys endemic to the Democratic Republic of Congo in equatorial Central Africa. Home for most individuals is the sedimentary Congo Basin. Prior to being classified as its own species, the golden-bellied mangabey (Cercocebus chrysogaster) had been considered a subspecies of…

LEARN MORE ABOUT GOLDEN-BELLIED MANGABEYS

Cercocebus torquatus

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The red-capped mangabey, also known as the collared mangabey, red-crowned mangabey, or the white-collared mangabey, is native to the Atlantic coast of West and Central Africa. Specifically, the red-capped mangabey is found in coastal, swamp, mangrove, and valley forests from western Nigeria, east and south into…

LEARN MORE ABOUT RED-CAPPED MANGABEYS

Photo: © markusgmeiner/iNaturalist/Creative Commons

Cercocebus sanjei

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

Sanje mangabeys, also known as Sanje River mangabeys and Sanje crested mangabeys, are Old World monkeys native to Tanzania, a sovereign state of eastern Africa. They occur only in Tanzania’s Udzungwa Mountains, residing on the eastern slopes at a wide range of altitudes from 1,312 to 4,266 ft (400-1,300 m) above…

LEARN MORE ABOUT SANJE MANGABEYS

Cercocebus atys

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The sooty mangabey, also called the spectacled mangabey, is native to West Africa. The geographic range includes the coastal countries of Senegal, Guinea-Bissau, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Cote d’Ivoire west of the Nzo-Sassandra River system. Sadly, this species has drastically declined throughout much of its natural…

LEARN MORE ABOUT SOOTY MANGABEYS

Photo courtesy of © Julie Wieczkowski. Used with permission.

Cercocebus galeritus

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The Tana River mangabey, also known as the Tana River crested mangabey, is endemic to a small stretch of floodplain forests along the Tana River in Kenya. They occupy about 27 small (under 1,200 acre/5 km²) forests, many of which are fragmented, both naturally and anthropogenically. The species’ entire range is less…

LEARN MORE ABOUT TANA RIVER MANGABEYS

Cercocebus lunulatus

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

The white-naped mangabey, also known as the white-collared or white-crowned mangabey, is native to the West African countries of Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana, and possibly a small area in Burkina Faso. White-naped mangabeys were first discovered in Burkina Faso in 2006, and by 2014, they were already believed to be extirpated…

LEARN MORE ABOUT WHITE-NAPED MANGABEYS