LEMURS

Lemur taxonomy is controversial and complicated.
At least 125 species are recognized,
​​divided into 5 families and 15 genera

AYE-AYE

Genus: Daubentonia

Daubentonia madagascariensis

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

The elusive and sorely misunderstood aye-aye, the oldest type of living lemur, is endemic to Madagascar, the fourth largest island in the world. Situated off the coast of East Africa, Madagascar is home to an abundance of unique animals and plants that cannot be found anywhere else on the planet. It is within this richly biodiverse…

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BAMBOO OR GENTLE LEMURS

Genus: Hapalemur

Hapalemur griseus

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The eastern lesser bamboo lemur, also known as the gray bamboo lemur, the gray gentle lemur, and the Mahajanga lemur, is native to the large island country of Madagascar. Regarded by conservationists as a world biodiversity hot spot—home to species found nowhere else in the world—Madagascar is situated about…

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Hapalemur aureus

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

Golden bamboo lemurs, bokombolomena in Malagasy, are endemic to Madagascar, where they live in the southeastern bamboo-laden tropical forests and marshes. They occupy lowland and montane forests and they inhabit primary rainforests within a couple different protected areas, such as Ranomafana National Park and…

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Hapalemur alaotrensis

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The Lac Alaotra gentle lemur, also known as the Alaotra reed lemur, Alaotran gentle lemur, Lac Alaotra bamboo lemur, or locally as the bandro, is, like all lemurs, endemic to the island of Madagascar. Lac Alaotra gentle lemurs have a very limited range of about 49,000 acres (20,000 ha), found only in the papyrus and reed beds around…

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BAMBOO OR GENTLE LEMURS

Genus: Prolemur

Prolemur simus

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The greater bamboo lemurs, also known as broad-nosed bamboo lemurs or broad-nosed gentle lemurs, are endemic to Madagascar. This large island, located approximately 250 miles (400 km) off the coast of East Africa, is an important biodiversity hotspot. It is home to numerous animal and plant species that do not exist anywhere else in the world. Fossil…

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BROWN OR "TRUE" LEMURS

Genus: Eulemur

Eulemur macaco

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

Black lemurs are found in northwestern Madagascar, near the Mahavavy River in the north and the Andranomalaza River in the southern part of the region. There are other populations on the islands of Nosy Be and Nosy Komba, and in the coastal forests northeast of Ambanja. Their main habitats are wet evergreen, dry…

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Eulemur fulvus

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

Like all lemurs, brown lemurs are endemic to Madagascar—a country approximately 250 miles (400 km) off the coast of East Africa, and the fourth largest island in the world (it is almost twice the size of Arizona). Because the island has been detached from Africa for 180 million years and is isolated from any other continent, most of…

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Eulemur coronatus

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

Crowned lemurs, once believed to be a sub-species of the mongoose lemur, are endemic to northern Madagascar. Their habitat extends east of the Mahavavy River and into the most northerly point of the African island; they occur anywhere from sea level to 4593 ft (1400 m) in elevation. They are sympatric throughout…

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Eulemur mongoz

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The mongoose lemur is endemic to the northwestern forests of the island of Madagascar. Much of their habitat consists of dry deciduous forests, fragmented forests, and scrublands. They can also thrive in northwestern Madagascar’s secondary forests. Most plants and animals found in Madagascar are unique to the island, mainly…

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Eulemur rubriventer

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The red-bellied lemur is a species of Eulemur endemic to Madagascar. This primate inhabits a long, narrow strip of intact primary and secondary rainforest along the island’s eastern coast. While the red-bellied lemur’s distribution is not well-documented, populations are found at high altitudes in Tsaratanana Massif at the north…

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Photo credit: John Surrey/Creative Commons

Eulemur rufifrons

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The red-fronted brown lemur, sometimes called simply the red-fronted lemur, is found in dry, tropical forests in western Madagascar and moist lowland and montane forest in eastern Madagascar. In western Madagascar, it is found between the Tsiribihina River in the north and the Fiherenana River in the south. In eastern Madagascar…

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Photo credit: © Julian Mr.Lemur/iNaturalist/Creative Commons

Eulemur cinereiceps

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The white-collared lemur, also called the white-collared brown lemur or the gray-headed lemur, is endemic to a thin strip of tropical lowland and montane forest in southeastern Madagascar, from the Manampatrana River south to the Mananara River. They have one of the most restricted ranges of all the true lemurs, and only about 270 square mi (700 square km) of habitat remains. Madagascar’s forest is sadly dwindling and, coupled with human-caused climate change, the amount of habitat…

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Eulemur albifrons

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The white-headed lemur, also known as the white-headed brown lemur, white-fronted brown lemur, or white-fronted lemur, is found throughout most of the remaining rainforest in northeastern Madagascar, from the Bemarivo River to the Masoala Peninsula. They were introduced to Nosy Mangabe Reserve and another isolated…

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DWARF LEMURS

Genus: Cheirogaleus

Photo credit: Frank Vassen/Creative Commons

Cheirogaleus medius

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The fat-tailed dwarf lemur, also known as lesser dwarf lemurs, or western fat-tailed dwarf lemurs, is endemic to the dry deciduous forests of western Madagascar. Madagascar experiences a hot, wet season from November to April, and a cool, dry season from May to October. During the dry season, water is extremely scarce on the…

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Photo credit: Bernard DUPONT/Creative Commons

Cheirogaleus major

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

Geoffroy’s dwarf lemurs are found in northeastern and western central Madagascar. They can be spotted from the southeastern tip to the northeastern tip, with a small population isolated inland in the west-central part of the island. Geoffroy’s dwarf lemurs, which are also known as greater dwarf lemurs, are sympatric with fat…

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INDRI

Genus: Indri

Indri

CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

Like all lemurs, indris are endemic to the island of Madagascar. This large island’s unique geography makes it a vibrant tapestry of diverse climates and distinct environments. Indris make their homes in the lush tropical rainforests growing along this island’s eastern coast. Here, the land slopes down from the mountainous central…

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MOUSE LEMURS

Microcebus

Photo credit: Blanchard Randrianambinina/Creative Commons

Microcebus gerpi

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALL ENDANGERED

The Gerp’s mouse lemur is only found in the Sahafina forest and surrounding secondary forests in eastern Madagascar. The region is a mix of dense lowland forest and formerly logged woodlands now in recovery. This area of the island nation is particularly humid due to its placement in between the Indian Ocean and the Central…

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Microcebus murinus

CONSERVATION STATUS: LEAST CONCERN

The gray mouse lemur, also known as the lesser mouse lemur, is endemic to Madagascar. They mainly occupy dry deciduous forests from Mahajanga in the northwest to Tulear in the southwest, along most of the west coast. A distinct population has also been found in the southeast near Fort Dulphin. The gray mouse lemur is one of…

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Microcebus griseorufus

CONSERVATION STATUS: LEAST CONCERN

The gray-brown mouse lemur is a prosimian that is found throughout the Toliara province, which spans much of south and southwestern coastline of Madagascar. Prosimians are the most primitive of the primates, and they all live in the Old World—that is, Africa or Asia. Gray-brown mouse lemurs, like all lemurs, are endemic to the…

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Microcebus berthae

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

Sometimes known as the pygmy mouse lemur or Berthe’s mouse lemur, the Madame Berthe’s mouse lemur is named after the conservationist and primatologist Berthe Rakotosamimanana of Madagascar. This species of lemur is restricted to a small area within the Menabe region in western Madagascar. They live in highly seasonal…

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Microcebus myoxinus

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

Originally described in 1858, the pygmy mouse lemur (Microcebus myoxinus), also known as Peters’ mouse lemur, dormouse lemur, or western rufous mouse lemur, was thought to be extinct until its rediscovery in the Kirindy Forest of Madagascar in 1993. Like all lemurs, they are endemic to the island of Madagascar. They make…

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GIANT MOUSE LEMURS

Genus: Mirza

Mirza zaza

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The northern giant mouse lemur is endemic to Madagascar. They are found primarily in the dry forests of the northwest region of the Ampasindava Peninsula, specifically in Ambato and Pasandava. They also inhabit secondary forests, old banana plantations, gallery forests, and abandoned cashew orchards. Madagascar is well…

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Mirza coquereli

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

Like all lemurs, Coquerel’s giant mouse lemurs (Mirza coquereli), also called Coquerel’s dwarf lemurs or Coquerel’s mouse-lemurs, are endemic to the island of Madagascar. They are primarily found in the dry and gallery forests on the southwestern portion of the island, between the Onilahy and Tsiribinha rivers. They can…

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RING TAILED LEMUR

Genus: Lemur

Lemur catta

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

Ring-tailed lemurs are found in the wild only on the geographically isolated African island of Madagascar, along with other lemur species and animals found nowhere else on earth. They are far more ecologically flexible than other lemur species and can tolerate a variety of extreme environments and drastic temperature ranges. Their…

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RUFFED LEMURS

Genus: Varecia

Varecia variegata

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The black-and-white ruffed lemur is endemic to the island of Madagascar. It is sparsely distributed throughout the declining eastern tropical rainforests, from the Antainambalana River to the Mananara River. The black-and-white ruffed lemur lives in ten protected areas, but their population size is still declining. In the past thirty years…

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Varecia rubra

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

Red ruffed lemurs are endemic, or native, to the island of Madagascar, located off of Africa’s southeast coast. These wild populations are found nowhere else in the world. With an extremely restricted range, red ruffed lemurs occupy only a small section of their large island. The deciduous tropical rainforests of the Masoala…

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SIFAKAS

Genus: Propithecus

Propithecus coquereli

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

Like all lemurs, the Coquerel’s sifaka (pronounced “shuh–fokk”) is endemic to Madagascar. More specifically, the Coquerel’s sifaka lives in the dry deciduous forests of northwest Madagascar. Each sifaka family sticks to a territory of 10-22 acres. Just exactly how the ancestors of sifakas and other mammals arrived in Madagascar…

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Propithecus coronatus

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The crowned sifaka, not to be confused with the closely related golden-crowned sifaka, is a species of lemur that, like all lemurs, is endemic to the island of Madagascar. This species inhabits the dry deciduous and mangrove forests of the northwest side of Madagascar, and can be found up to an elevation of about 2,300…

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Propithecus diadema

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

Like all lemurs, the diademed sifakas are endemic to Madagascar and live in the eastern and northeastern rainforests of the island, at altitudes between 2,260 and 5,000 ft (800-1500 m). It is thought to be one of the most widely distributed of the sifaka species. Diademed sifakas are large lemurs, the smallest of them being…

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Photo credit: Alex Chiang/Flickr/Creative Commons​

Propithecus tattersalli

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

Golden-crowned sifakas, also known as Tattersall’s sifakas, are endemic to Loky-Manambato, near the town of Daraina, in northeastern Madagascar. The area spreads over approximately 960 square miles (2,500 square kilometers). It is one of the richest for its biodiversity, with over 1,200 plant species as well as many reptiles…

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Propithecus edwardsi

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

Like all species of lemurs, the Milne-Edwards’s sifaka, also known as the Milne-Edwards’s simpona, is found only on the island of Madagascar. They inhabit both continuous and fragmented primary and secondary rainforests along a strip of southeastern Madagascar at elevations of 1,967–5,250 ft (600–1,600 m). Their home ranges…

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Photos credit: Kris Norvig/Creative Commons

Propithecus perrieri

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

As one of the world’s rarest lemurs and most threatened primates, Perrier’s sifaka makes its home on the island of Madagascar, the only place on the planet where the remaining few hundred individuals of this Critically Endangered species can be found. Situated off the coast of East Africa, the island of Madagascar stands as a…

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Propithecus candidus

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

Silky sifakas, also known as silky simponas, inhabit montane and mid-altitude rainforests. They reside in a restricted range in northeastern Madagascar, mostly in Marojejy National Park and Anjanaharibe-Sub Special Reserve (ASSR). Although populations are more fragmented, they are also found in the Makira Natural Park and…

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Propithecus verreauxi

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

Verreaux’s sifakas, like all lemurs, make their home in Madagascar and nowhere else in the world. They live in a wide range of diverse habitats over the southwestern and southern regions of the island. The habitats of these areas vary dramatically from dry spiny transitional forest patches to more humid rainforests. Verreaux’s sifakas…

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Photo credit: Heinonlein/Creative Commons

Propithecus verreauxi

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The Von der Decken’s sifaka or simply Decken’s sifaka, is one of nine distinct species of sifakas endemic to Madagascar. It and three other species that live on the western half of the island were once considered a subspecies of the Verreaux sifaka (Propithecus verreaux). Recently, closer anatomical research has determined…

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SPORTIVE LEMURS

Genus: Lepilemur

Lepilemur ankaranensis

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

The Ankarana sportive lemur is one of many sportive lemur species endemic to Madagascar. In particular, this little lemur is found in northern Madagascar in the damp evergreen forests and dry lowland forests of Ankarana, Andrafiamena, and Analamerana. Many range boundaries of sportive lemurs remain unknown…

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Lepilemur dorsalis

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

Gray’s sportive lemurs, also known as gray-backed sportive lemurs or Nossi-bé sportive lemurs, are endemic to Madagascar and restricted to the northwestern Sambirano region of the island. The humid and sub-humid forests they inhabit are about 500 feet (155 m) above sea level and barely cover a 2.5-square-mile (4.5 square km)….

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Photo credit: Tato Grasso/Creative Commons

Lepilemur tymerlachsoni

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The Nosy Be sportive lemur, also known as Hawks’ sportive lemur, lives on the island of Nosy Be in the Lokobe region of northwestern Madagascar. The species inhabits primary and secondary forests where foliage is lush and dense and where hollowed tree trunks offer them obscure places to nest peacefully. Their need to remain…

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Lepilemur randrianasoloi

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

Like all lemurs, Randrianasolo’s sportive lemur, also known as the Bemaraha sportive lemur, is found only in the isolated island country of Madagascar, situated in the Indian Ocean about 250 mi (400 km) off the coast of East Africa across the Mozambique Channel. These prosimians live in the central-western region of the country…

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Lepilemur septentrionalis

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The Sahafary sportive lemur, also known as the northern sportive lemur or northern weasel lemur, is, like all lemurs, endemic to the island of Madagascar. Specifically, they reside in the far northern reaches of the island, north of the Irodo River, at elevations between 525 and 1,760 feet (160–537 m) above sea level in dry…

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Lepilemur sahamalaza

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The Sahamalaza sportive lemur, also called the Sahamalaza Peninsula sportive lemur, is believed to be restricted to the Sahamalaza Peninsula in northwestern Madagascar and inhabits both primary and mature secondary forests. Unfortunately, this area has been subject to high levels of deforestation and only a handful of forest…

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Lepilemur microdon

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

The small-toothed sportive lemur, also known as the light-necked sportive lemur and the microdon sportive lemur, is endemic to Madagascar. They are found in the south and central regions of the eastern rainforest near Toamasina and Taolanaro. The small-toothed sportive lemur lives in dense rainforests ranging from…

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Lepilemur mustelinus

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

Weasel sportive lemurs, also called greater sportive lemurs or greater weasel lemurs, are endemic to the primary and secondary rainforests of Eastern Madagascar, a large island off the coast of East Africa. The species is found in protected areas, such as the Mantadia and Zahamena national parks, the Analamazoatra and Mangerivola…

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Lepilemur leucopus

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

White-footed sportive lemurs, also known as white-footed weasel lemurs or dry-bush weasel lemurs, are endemic to the southern region of Madagascar, an island located off the east coast of Africa. In Malagasy, the national language of Madagascar, they are called songikyWhite-footed sportive lemurs are mainly found…

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WOOLY LEMUR OR WOOLY INDRI

Genus: Avahi

Photo credit: Leonora (Ellie) Enking/Flickr/Creative Common

Avahi laniger

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The eastern woolly lemur, also known as the eastern avahi or Gmelin’s woolly lemur, is a native of the large island country of Madagascar. Situated about 249 mi (400 km) off of Africa’s southeastern coast in the Indian Ocean, Madagascar is home to species found nowhere else in the world and is regarded by conservationists as…

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