CAPUCHIN MONKEYS

The capuchin family, Cebinae, includes two genera, and at least twenty-eight species and nine subspecies.

GRACILE CAPUCHINS

Genus: Cebus

Cebus capucinus

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

Colombian white-throated capuchins, also known as white-throated capuchins, white-faced capuchins, white-fronted capuchins, and white-headed capuchins, are natives to eastern Panama (east of the Panama Canal watershed), the Pacific coast of Colombia (south of the Panamanian border and west of the Andes, and…

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Cebus aequatorialis

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

As the name suggests, the Ecuadorian white-fronted capuchin is primarily found in Ecuador. This capuchin monkey is arboreal and is distributed in the tropical and subtropical forested regions of western Ecuador and northern Peru. The population density is about 2-22 monkeys for every 0.38 square miles (1 sq km). Seen in both ..

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Cebus olivaceus

CONSERVATION STATUS: LEAST CONCERN

Guianan weeper capuchins, also known as wedge-capped capuchins or weeper capuchins, are native to South America, with populations ranging from the Venezuelan Amazon Basin to the drier forests along the Essequibo River in Guyana. They also occupy the forested area between the Branco River and the Araca River…

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Cebus albifrons

CONSERVATION STATUS: LEAST CONCERN

The Humboldt’s white-fronted capuchin monkey is endemic to Brazil, Colombia, and Venezuela, specifically in the northern Amazon regions. They can be found in different forest types ranging from dry-deciduous forests to flooded rainforests and mangrove forests.  They are also known as brown pale-fronted or pale-fronted…

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Cebus imitator

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

As their name suggests, Panamanian white-throated capuchins, also called Panamanian white-faced capuchins, are native to Central America—from Honduras to Panama. They thrive in the neotropical rainforests of this region, and most of the research on wild populations was conducted in Costa Rica. Neotropical rainforests…

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Photo credit: © Rigoberto Pantoja/iNaturalist/Creative Commons

Cebus cuscinus

CONSERVATION STATUS: NEAR THREATENED

The shock-headed capuchin is native to the South American countries of Bolivia, Brazil, and Peru, although their exact range is not well understood. Making their homes in both lowland and montane forests up to an elevation of 5,900 feet (1,800 m), shock-headed capuchins are well adjusted to a mostly arboreal life high in the…

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ROBUST CAPUCHINS

Genus: Sapajus

Sapajus cay

CONSERVATION STATUS: NEAR THREATENED

The Azara’s capuchin, also known as the hooded capuchin or yellow bearded capuchin, is found in eastern Paraguay, southeastern Bolivia, northern Argentina, and the states of Mato Grosso and Mato Grosso do Sul in Brazil. Their habitat consists of humid, subtropical, semi-deciduous gallery forests (those formed along…

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Sapajus libidinosus

CONSERVATION STATUS: NEAR THREATENED

The bearded capuchin, also known as the black-striped capuchin, is found in northern and central Brazil. The species inhabits dry, deciduous forest and savanna landscapes. Its range is bordered by the Rio Araguaia to the east and the Rio Grande to the south. Unlike some other capuchin species, it is not found in the Amazon…

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Sapajus apella

CONSERVATION STATUS: LEAST CONCERN

Black-capped capuchins, also known as tufted capuchins, are native to South America, where they are ubiquitous throughout the Amazon River Basin. Extant populations reside in the countries of Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Peru, Suriname, and Venezuela. A breeding population was…

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Sapajus nigritus

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

The black-horned capuchin, also known as the black capuchin, is native to the South American countries of Argentina and Brazil. This small American monkey is at home in the lowland and montane tropical Atlantic Forest biome, at elevations between 980 and 3,280 feet (300 and 1000 m) above sea level. Black-horned…

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Photo credit: Miguelrangeljr/Creative Commons

Sapajus flavius

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

First described by Brazilian naturalist Georg Marcgrave in 1648, blond capuchins were rediscovered in 2006, incorporated into the known taxonomy, and given the scientific name Cebus flavius. In 2012, robust (or tufted) capuchins were separated out of genus Cebus in 2012 to form their own genus, Sapajus, to…

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Sapajus xanthosternos

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The golden-bellied capuchin, also called yellow-breasted capuchins and buffy capuchins, is a New World monkey found mostly in the state of Bahia on the east coast of Brazil. They live in tropical rainforests with annual rainfalls averaging around 71 in (180 cm) and an average temperature of 75°F (24°C)…

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