LORISES

The loris family, Lorisidae,
​includes 2 genera, and at least
​11 species and 2 subspecies

SLENDER LORISES

Genus: Loris

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Photo credit: Maky/ Creative Common

Loris lydekkerianus

CONSERVATION STATUS: NEAR THREATENED

The gray slender loris is endemic to the eastern and western Ghat mountains of southern India and the island nation of Sri Lanka. These prosimian primates (the oldest, most “primitive” group of primates) have been geographically categorized into four distinct subspecies. The Malabar gray slender loris and the Mysore gray… 

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Photo credit: Dr. K.A.I. Nekaris/ Creative Common

Loris tardigradus

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

The red slender loris, also known as the slender loris, the Sri Lanka slender loris, and the Sri Lanka wet zone slender loris, is endemic to 100 to 110 different locations throughout Sri Lanka’s southwestern wet zone. The region is referred to as the “wet zone” because it receives about 10 feet (3 m) of rain every year… 

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SLOW LORIS

Genus: Nycticebus

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There are few photos available of the Bangka slow loris. This is a similar species, the Bornean slow loris.

Nycticebus bancanus

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The olive colobus, also called green colobus and Van Beneden’s colobus, is endemic to the western coast of Africa, living in Benin, Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Togo. An isolated population can also be found in eastern Nigeria. Olive colobus monkeys live in the rainforest habitat where they prefer the…

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Nycticebus bengalensis

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

The Bengal slow loris is a native of southeastern Asia, residing in the countries of Bangladesh, Cambodia, Vietnam, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Thailand, Myanmar (formerly Burma), northeastern India, and southern China. Of all the loris species, the Bengal slow loris occupies the greatest and northernmost range, with the largest populations living in eastern Thailand. These prosimians (the oldest, most “primitive” order of…

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Photo credit:7layersoflands/Creative Commons

Nycticebus borneanus

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The Bornean slow loris lives in the central and southern portions of Borneo in the Indonesian provinces of West, South, and Central Kalimantan. All Bornean varieties of slow loris were previously thought to be the same species. Known scientifically as Nycticebus menagensis, and commonly as the Bornean slow loris, three…

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Photo credit: Dr. K.A.I. Nekaris/Creative Commons

Nycticebus javanicus

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

Javan slow lorises are endemic to the Indonesian island of Java, where they inhabit the western and southern regions of the island. They make their homes in primary and secondary forests, bamboo and mangrove forests, and even chocolate plantations. Unfortunately, their habitat is shrinking, with an estimated 20% of their historic habitat remaining. They were originally thought to be a subspecies of the closely related Sunda slow loris…

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Photo credit:Jmiksanek/Creative Commons

Nycticebus kayan

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The Kayan River slow loris, also called the Kayan slow loris, lives on the island of Borneo and is named for the Kayan River that runs through its range. Distinguished as a unique species in 2013 and only assessed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature in 2015, the species’ full geographic distribution remains…

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Photo credit: Dick Knight/Flickr/Creative Commons​

Nycticebus menagensis

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The Philippine slow loris lives along the northern and eastern coasts of Borneo and on the Philippine islands of Tawi-Tawi, Bongao, and Sanga-Sanga. The species thrives in primary and secondary lowland forests that, unfragmented, allow them plenty of lush jungle in which to forage. The species’ official name and taxonomy…

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Photo credit:David Haring,Duke Lemur Center/Creative Commons

Nycticebus pygmaeus

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

The pygmy slow loris, also called the lesser slow loris, is a small-bodied prosimian found in Southern China, Eastern Cambodia, Laos, and east of the Mekong River in Vietnam. They inhabit rainforests and evergreen forests and are also found in secondary and degraded forests and bamboo plantations. Throughout their range they…

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Photo credit: David Haring/Duke Lemur Center/ Creative Commons

Nycticebus coucang

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

The Sunda slow lorisalso known as the greater slow loris, is named for the Sunda Islands in Malaysia, where the species lives; they are also native to parts of Indonesia, Thailand, and Singapore. Locals in these regions know the Sunda slow loris by other names. Its scientific name, coucang, derives from its common name in…

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