"TRUE" LEMURS

Includes ring-tailed lemurs with one species, brown lemurs with seven species, gentle or bamboo lemurs with five species and three subspecies, greater bamboo lemurs with one species, and ruffed lemurs with two species and three subspecies.

LESSER BAMBOO OR GENTLE LEMURS

Genus: Hapalemur

Hapalemur griseus

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The eastern lesser bamboo lemur, also known as the gray bamboo lemur, the gray gentle lemur, and the Mahajanga lemur, is native to the large island country of Madagascar. Regarded by conservationists as a world biodiversity hot spot—home to species found nowhere else in the world—Madagascar is situated about…

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Hapalemur aureus

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

Golden bamboo lemurs, bokombolomena in Malagasy, are endemic to Madagascar, where they live in the southeastern bamboo-laden tropical forests and marshes. They occupy lowland and montane forests and they inhabit primary rainforests within a couple different protected areas, such as Ranomafana National Park and…

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Hapalemur alaotrensis

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The Lac Alaotra gentle lemur, also known as the Alaotra reed lemur, Alaotran gentle lemur, Lac Alaotra bamboo lemur, or locally as the bandro, is, like all lemurs, endemic to the island of Madagascar. Lac Alaotra gentle lemurs have a very limited range of about 49,000 acres (20,000 ha), found only in the papyrus and reed…

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GREATER BAMBOO LEMURS

Genus: Prolemur

Prolemur simus

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The greater bamboo lemurs, also known as broad-nosed bamboo lemurs or broad-nosed gentle lemurs, are endemic to Madagascar. This large island, located approximately 250 miles (400 km) off the coast of East Africa, is an important biodiversity hotspot. It is home to numerous animal and plant species that do…

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BROWN LEMURS

Genus: Eulemur

Eulemur macaco

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

Black lemurs are found in northwestern Madagascar, near the Mahavavy River in the north and the Andranomalaza River in the southern part of the region. There are other populations on the islands of Nosy Be and Nosy Komba, and in the coastal forests northeast of Ambanja. Their main habitats are wet evergreen, dry…

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Eulemur fulvus

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

Like all lemurs, brown lemurs are endemic to Madagascar—a country approximately 250 miles (400 km) off the coast of East Africa, and the fourth largest island in the world (it is almost twice the size of Arizona). Because the island has been detached from Africa for 180 million years and is isolated from any other continent, most of…

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Eulemur coronatus

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

Crowned lemurs, once believed to be a sub-species of the mongoose lemur, are endemic to northern Madagascar. Their habitat extends east of the Mahavavy River and into the most northerly point of the African island; they occur anywhere from sea level to 4593 ft (1400 m) in elevation. They are sympatric throughout…

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Eulemur mongoz

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The mongoose lemur is endemic to the northwestern forests of the island of Madagascar. Much of their habitat consists of dry deciduous forests, fragmented forests, and scrublands. They can also thrive in northwestern Madagascar’s secondary forests. Most plants and animals found in Madagascar are unique to…

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Eulemur rubriventer

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The red-bellied lemur is a species of Eulemur endemic to Madagascar. This primate inhabits a long, narrow strip of intact primary and secondary rainforest along the island’s eastern coast. While the red-bellied lemur’s distribution is not well-documented, populations are found at high altitudes in Tsaratanana Massif at…

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Photo credit: John Surrey/Creative Commons

Eulemur rufifrons

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The red-fronted brown lemur, sometimes called simply the red-fronted lemur, is found in dry, tropical forests in western Madagascar and moist lowland and montane forest in eastern Madagascar. In western Madagascar, it is found between the Tsiribihina River in the north and the Fiherenana River in the south…

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Photo credit: © Julian Mr.Lemur/iNaturalist/Creative Commons

Eulemur cinereiceps

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The white-collared lemur, also called the white-collared brown lemur or the gray-headed lemur, is endemic to a thin strip of tropical lowland and montane forest in southeastern Madagascar, from the Manampatrana River south to the Mananara River. They have one of the most restricted ranges of all the true lemurs, and only about 270 square mi (700 square km) of habitat remains. Madagascar’s forest is…

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Eulemur albifrons

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The white-headed lemur, also known as the white-headed brown lemur, white-fronted brown lemur, or white-fronted lemur, is found throughout most of the remaining rainforest in northeastern Madagascar, from the Bemarivo River to the Masoala Peninsula. They were introduced to Nosy Mangabe Reserve and another…

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RING TAILED LEMUR

Genus: Lemur

Lemur catta

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

Ring-tailed lemurs are found in the wild only on the geographically isolated African island of Madagascar, along with other lemur species and animals found nowhere else on earth. They are far more ecologically flexible than other lemur species and can tolerate a variety of extreme environments and drastic temperature ranges…

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RUFFED LEMURS

Genus: Varecia

Varecia variegata

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The black-and-white ruffed lemur is endemic to the island of Madagascar. It is sparsely distributed throughout the declining eastern tropical rainforests, from the Antainambalana River to the Mananara River. The black-and-white ruffed lemur lives in ten protected areas, but their population size is still declining. In the past…

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Varecia rubra

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

Red ruffed lemurs are endemic, or native, to the island of Madagascar, located off of Africa’s southeast coast. These wild populations are found nowhere else in the world. With an extremely restricted range, red ruffed lemurs occupy only a small section of their large island. The deciduous tropical rainforests of the Masoala…

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