TITI MONKEYS

The titi monkey family, Callicebinae, includes three genera, and at least thirty species.

AMAZONIAN TITIS

Genus: Plecturocebus

Plecturocebus donacophilus

CONSERVATION STATUS: LEAST CONCERN

The Bolivian gray titi, also known as the white-eared titi and the Bolivian titi, is a New World monkey native to the South American countries of Bolivia and Brazil. Its geographic distribution extends from the upper parts of the Mamoré, Río Grande, and San Miguel (Itonomas) river basins east of the Manique River in Beni, Bolivia… 

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Photo: © Bradley Davis/iNaturalist/Creative Commons

Plecturocebus brunneus

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The brown titi is endemic to the Brazilian state of Rondônia. It is found nowhere else in the world. Their range is bounded by the Mamoré, Madeira, and Jiparaná rivers. They make their homes in the well-drained, nutrient-rich rainforests of the Amazon. They are relatively tolerant of habitat disturbance, but their population has been…

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Photo courtesy of ©Javier Garcia. Used with permission.

Plecturocebus caquetensis

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The Caquetá titi, also known as the red-bearded or bushy-bearded titi, was first spotted by a scientist in 1969, although, because of armed conflict issues, it was unable to be properly recognized as a species until 2010. Sadly, by the time Caquetá titis were recognized by science, they were already critically endangered. Caquetá….

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Plecturocebus pallescens

CONSERVATION STATUS: LEAST CONCERN

Chacoan titi monkeys are small primates from South America. They live in the neotropics south of the Amazon Rainforest, spanning southeast Bolivia (Santa Cruz), northwest Paraguay (Chaco), and small patches of southwestern Brazil (Mato Grosso do Sul). Sometimes known as white-coated titi monkeys or pale titi…

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Plecturocebus cupreus

CONSERVATION STATUS: LEAST CONCERN

The coppery titi monkey, also called the red titi, is a New World monkey indigenous to northwest South America. They inhabit the Amazon forests of Peru and Brazil, and are mainly found in terra firme forests, often occupying the middle and lower canopy strata. They are rarely seen in várzea forests, which are common…

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Plecturocebus ornatus

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

Ornate titis, sometimes called dusky titi monkeys, are  Latin American primates that are endemic to the forests of eastern Colombia. Ornate titis are only found in northern regions and are separated from other closely related titis by at least 217 miles (350 km). Their range extends further north than that of other titi monkey…

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Photo credit:©Nelson Wisnik/iNaturalist/Creative Common

Plecturocebus moloch

CONSERVATION STATUS: LEAST CONCERN

The red-bellied titi, also known as the dusky titi, is a species of New World monkey living in the forests south of the Amazon River. Restricted by the Paraguay and Pilcomayo rivers, this species’ range extends as far south as Paraguay. To the west, its range is confined by the towering Andes mountains while it stretches east as…

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Photo credit:©Jhoin Bard/iNaturalist/Creative Commons

Plecturocebus oenanthe

CONSERVATION STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

The San Martin titi, also known as the Rio Mayo titi or Andean titi monkey, is endemic to the San Martin region of Peru, and it is considered Peru’s most endangered primate. They make their homes in low secondary forests and are often seen in bamboo groves, viney thickets, fruit groups, and palm-dominated forests…

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Plecturocebus discolor

CONSERVATION STATUS: LEAST CONCERN

White-tailed titi monkeys—also called red titi monkeys, and not to be confused with coppery titis (Callicebus cupreus) who are also commonly called red titis—are native to the dense rainforests and gallery forests of Ecuador and Peru. A small population can also be found in Colombia. White-tailed titis are small monkeys

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ATLANTIC TITIS

Genus: Callicebus

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The coastal black-handed titi, also known as the black-handed titi and Southern Bahian masked titi, is local to the coastal forests of the Brazilian Atlantic coast. Specifically, their range extends from the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia to the northern part of the state of Espírito Santo, or between the Mucuri…

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Callicebus coimbrai

CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDANGERED

Coimbra-Filho’s titi monkey, or simply known as Coimbra’s titi, is native to Brazil, residing in the northeastern states of Bahia and Sergipe within heavily fragmented patches of Atlantic coastal forest. These sparsely occupied forest fragments vary in size from less than 0.02 square mile (0.05 sq km) in Lamerão/Minas d’Água, Bahia…

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Callicebus personatus

CONSERVATION STATUS: VULNERABLE

The masked titi, also called the northern masked titi or Atlantic titi, is endemic to one of the most biodiverse rainforests of Latin America: the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. Located east of the Andes Mountains, this coastal stretch of woods hosts a variety of neotropical trees, vines, ferns, mosses, and epiphytes (air plants). It is…

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WIDOW TITIS

Genus: Cheracebus

Photo credit: Felipe Neira/Flickr/Creative Commons

Cheracebus torquatus

CONSERVATION STATUS: LEAST CONCERN

The collared titi, also known as the yellow-handed titi or the widow monkey, occupies the lush rainforests of the Amazon and is generally found north of Rio Solimões and south of Rio Negro, although their exact range is unclear, in part due to unclear distinctions between related species. They are believed to be endemic…

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Cheracebus lucifer

CONSERVATION STATUS: LEAST CONCERN

Lucifer titis, also known as yellow-handed titis and widow monkeys, are native to South America and are found in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. The geographic area in which they dwell is delimited by four rivers: Rio Solimões, Rio Napo, Rio Japurá, and Rio Caquetá. The average temperature in the region is…

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